What’S The First Thing You Should Do When You See Someone Unconscious?

What is the first thing you should do if a person is unconscious and not breathing?

Tilt their head gently back to be sure their airway is open.

If an unconscious person is not breathing, it may be necessary to move them carefully onto their back, while protecting their neck, so that they can receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Call 911 before administering CPR..

What do you do if you see someone collapsed?

If you find someone collapsed, you should first perform a primary survey. Do not place your face close to theirs. If you have established from this that they are unresponsive and not breathing, you should ask a helper to call 999 or 112 for emergency help while you start CPR.

What is the first thing you do in CPR?

If you’re well-trained and confident in your ability, check to see if there is a pulse and breathing. If there is no breathing or a pulse within 10 seconds, begin chest compressions. Start CPR with 30 chest compressions before giving two rescue breaths.

How long can you be unconscious for?

What are the long term effects of being knocked unconscious? It depends on the severity of the injury. If you lose consciousness briefly, and suffer a concussion, 75 to 90 percent of people will fully recover in a few months. But severe damage to the brain can cause unconsciousness for days, weeks, or even longer.

What are the ABC steps if a person is unconscious?

ABC (medicine)Opening the airway with a head tilt-chin lift maneuver.Looking, listening and feeling for breathing.Perform chest compressions to support circulation in those who are non-responsive without meaningful breaths.

What to do if someone collapses but is breathing?

Call or tell someone to call 911. Check the person’s airway, breathing, and pulse frequently. If necessary, begin CPR. If the person is breathing and lying on their back, and you do not think there is a spinal injury, carefully roll the person toward you onto their side.

What is the difference between fainting and collapsing?

A collapse may happen when you become unconscious for a few seconds, such as when you faint. You might fall to the ground and not respond to sounds or being shaken. Your pulse may become faint and you might even stop breathing. A person collapses when their brain isn’t getting enough oxygen.

What causes a person to suddenly collapse?

The most common cause of blacking out is fainting. Other causes include epileptic seizures, syncope due to anxiety (psychogenic pseudosyncope) and other rare causes of faints. Other causes of blacking out may be due to low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) and lack of oxygen (hypoxia) from a variety of causes.

What is ABC and CPR?

In first aid, ABC stands for airway, breathing, and circulation. The recovery position helps minimize further injury. CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It helps maintain the flow of oxygenated blood. While doing chest compressions, you may hear cracks.

What are the 3 C’s when dealing with an emergency?

Training your brain before you find yourself in a high-pressure situation may help you save a life or potentially help someone in pain. There are three basic C’s to remember—check, call, and care. When it comes to first aid, there are three P’s to remember—preserve life, prevent deterioration, and promote recovery.

What are the first 3 steps you should take when trying to help someone who is unconscious?

First Aid GuideCheck the person’s airway, breathing, and circulation.If you do not think there is a spinal injury, put the person in the recovery position: Position the person lying face up. Turn the person’s face toward you. … Keep the person warm until emergency medical help arrives.

How do you handle an unconscious patient?

If you see a person who has become unconscious, take these steps:Check whether the person is breathing. … Raise their legs at least 12 inches above the ground.Loosen any restrictive clothing or belts. … Check their airway to make sure there’s no obstruction.Check again to see if they’re breathing, coughing, or moving.More items…